Mt Hood Emergency Expo 2014 is coming!!!

Friday May 2nd 11:30 am to 7:00 pm
Saturday May 4th, 9:30 am to 6:00 pm

This FREE expo will have over 60 speakers and displays to help you BE PREPARED. Won't you join us?

Wednesday, December 7, 2011


First Aid Handouts

  *        small adhesive strip bandages
         *         large adhesive strip bandages
         *         assorted sizes adhesive strip bandages
         *         butterfly wound closures
         *         skin shield - liquid bandage
         *         sterile rolled/flexible bandage
         *         sterile gauze pads assorted sizes
         *         large sterile pads
         *         Q-tip
         *         muslin/triangular splinting bandage
         *         conforming 2-3" rolled gauze - bandage tape
         *         saran wrap or petroleum gauze air tight bandage
         *         transparent pads
         *         tampon - nose bleed
         *         foot blister protection pads
         *         sun block
         *         syringe - irrigate wound if needed
         *         safety pins/needle
         *         disposable gloves -Nitrile (non-latex)
         *         face masks
         *         small bottle water
         *         Betadine/Hibiclens/alcohol wipes/antiseptic wash
         *         hand sanitizer
         *         soap
         *         scissors
         *         tweezers
         *         hemostats (instrument for clamping)
         *         matches
         *         scalpel or pocket knife/multi-purpose tool
         *         CPR one way valve face shield
         *         thermal emergency blanket
         *         thermometer
         *         flashlight
         *         whistle
         *         eye wash
         *         eye patch
         *         small splints
         *         instant hot and cold packs
         *         small paper bag for hyperventilation
         *         emergency contact information
         *         first-aid pocket guides
         *         personal medications/Prescriptions - 7 days worth
         *         antiseptic spray, lotions or creams (triple antibiotic)
         *         aspirin
         *         Ibuprofen/Tylenol
         *         anti-diarrheal medication
         *         water purification tablets
         *         insect sting pain relief pad
         *         calamine or hydrocortisone cream
         *         Benadryl
         *         antihistamine tables
         *         antacids
         *         glucose tablets/candy/liquid glucose
         *         epi pen (RX needed)
         *         personal documentation - copy birth certificate contained in moisture proof holder
         *         family identification cards with lanyards
         *         contact telephone numbers - family plan

Household Injuries and First Aid Treatment
Allergic Reaction
A life-threatening allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) can cause shock, a sudden drop in blood pressure and trouble breathing. In people who have an allergy, anaphylaxis can occur minutes after exposure to a specific allergy-causing substance (allergen). In some cases, there may be a delayed reaction or anaphylaxis may occur without an apparent trigger.
If you're with someone having an allergic reaction with signs of anaphylaxis:
  • Immediately call 911 or your local medical emergency number.
  • Ask the person if he or she is carrying an epinephrine autoinjector to treat an allergic attack (for example, EpiPen, Twinject).
  • If the person says he or she needs to use an autoinjector, ask whether you should help inject the medication. This is usually done by pressing the autoinjector against the person's thigh.
  • Have the person lie still on his or her back.
  • Loosen tight clothing and cover the person with a blanket. Don't give the person anything to drink.
  • If there's vomiting or bleeding from the mouth, turn the person on his or her side to prevent choking.
  • If there are no signs of breathing, coughing or movement, begin CPR. Do uninterrupted chest presses — about 100 every minute — until paramedics arrive.
  • Get emergency treatment even if symptoms start to improve. After anaphylaxis, it's possible for symptoms to recur. Monitoring in a hospital setting for several hours is usually necessary.
If you're with someone having signs of anaphylaxis, don't wait to see whether symptoms get better. Seek emergency treatment right away. In severe cases, untreated anaphylaxis can lead to death within half an hour. An antihistamine pill, such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl), isn't sufficient to treat anaphylaxis. These medications can help relieve allergy symptoms, but work too slowly in a severe reaction.
Signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis include:
  • Skin reactions including hives, itching, and flushed or pale skin
  • Swelling of the face, eyes, lips or throat
  • Constriction of the airways, leading to wheezing and trouble breathing
  • A weak and rapid pulse
  • Nausea, vomiting or diarrhea
  • Dizziness, fainting or unconsciousness
Some common anaphylaxis triggers include:
  • Medications
  • Foods such as peanuts, tree nuts, fish and shellfish
  • Insect stings from bees, yellow jackets, wasps, hornets and fire ants
Bleeding, Cuts, and Scrapes
Minor cuts and scrapes usually don't require a trip to the emergency room. Yet proper care is essential to avoid infection or other complications. These guidelines can help you care for simple wounds:
·         Stop the bleeding. Minor cuts and scrapes usually stop bleeding on their own. If they don't, apply gentle pressure with a clean cloth or bandage. Hold the pressure continuously for 20 to 30 minutes and if possible elevate the wound.
·         Clean the wound. Rinse out the wound with clear water. Soap can irritate the wound, so try to keep it out of the actual wound. If dirt or debris remains in the wound after washing, use tweezers cleaned with alcohol to remove the particles. If debris still remains, see your doctor. Thorough cleaning reduces the risk of infection and tetanus. To clean the area around the wound, use soap and a washcloth. There's no need to use hydrogen peroxide, iodine or an iodine-containing cleanser.
·         Apply an antibiotic. After you clean the wound, apply a thin layer of an antibiotic cream or ointment to help keep the surface moist. Cover the wound. Bandages can help keep the wound clean and keep harmful bacteria out. After the wound has healed enough to make infection unlikely, exposure to the air will speed wound healing.
·         Change the dressing. Change the dressing at least daily or whenever it becomes wet or dirty.
·         Get stitches for deep wounds. A wound that is gaping or jagged edged and has fat or muscle protruding usually requires stitches. Adhesive strips or butterfly tape may hold a minor cut together, but if you can't easily close the wound, see your doctor Watch for signs of infection. See your doctor if the wound isn't healing or you notice any redness, increasing pain, drainage, warmth or swelling.
·         Get a tetanus shot. Doctors recommend you get a tetanus shot every 10 years..
  • Wash your hands and the blister with soap and warm water.
  • Swab the blister with iodine or rubbing alcohol.
  • Sterilize a clean, sharp needle by wiping it with rubbing alcohol.
  • Use the needle to puncture the blister. Aim for several spots near the blister's edge. Let the fluid drain, but leave the overlying skin in place.
  • Apply an antibiotic ointment to the blister and cover with a bandage or gauze pad.
  • Cut away all the dead skin after several days, using tweezers and scissors sterilized with rubbing alcohol. Apply more ointment and a bandage.
Severe Bleeding
·         Have the injured person lie down and cover the person to prevent loss of body heat. If possible, position the person's head slightly lower than the trunk or elevate the legs and elevate the site of bleeding.
·         While wearing gloves, remove any obvious dirt or debris from the wound. Don't remove any large or more deeply embedded objects. Your principal concern is to stop the bleeding.
·         Apply pressure directly on the wound until the bleeding stops. Use a sterile bandage or clean cloth and hold continuous pressure for at least 20 minutes without looking to see if the bleeding has stopped. Maintain pressure by binding the wound tightly with a bandage or clean cloth and adhesive tape. Use your hands if nothing else is available. If possible, wear rubber or latex gloves or use a clean plastic bag for protection.
·         Don't remove the gauze or bandage. If the bleeding continues and seeps through the gauze or other material you are holding on the wound, don't remove it. Instead, add more absorbent material on top of it.
·         Squeeze a main artery if necessary. If the bleeding doesn't stop with direct pressure, apply pressure to the artery delivering blood to the area. Pressure points of the arm are on the inside of the arm just above the elbow and just below the armpit. Pressure points of the leg are just behind the knee and in the groin. Squeeze the main artery in these areas against the bone. Keep your fingers flat. With your other hand, continue to exert pressure on the wound itself.
·         Immobilize the injured body part once the bleeding has stopped. Leave the bandages in place and get the injured person to the emergency room as soon as possible.

Breathing Emergencies - open airway call 911
  • Sit upright and lean forward. By remaining upright, you reduce blood pressure in the veins of your nose. This discourages further bleeding. Sitting forward will help you avoid swallowing blood, which can irritate your stomach.
  • Pinch your nose. Use your thumb and index finger to pinch your nostrils shut. Breathe through your mouth. Continue to pinch for five to 10 minutes. Pinching sends pressure to the bleeding point on the nasal septum and often stops the flow of blood.
  • To prevent re-bleeding, don't pick or blow your nose and don't bend down for several hours after the bleeding episode. During this time remember to keep your head higher than the level of your heart.
  • If re-bleeding occurs, blow out forcefully to clear your nose of blood clots and spray both sides of your nose with a decongestant nasal spray containing oxymetazoline (Afrin, Mucinex Moisture Smart, others). Pinch your nose again as described above and call your doctor.
Seek medical care immediately if
  • The bleeding lasts for more than 20 minutes
A bruise forms when a blow breaks blood vessels near your skin's surface, allowing a small amount of blood to leak into the tissues under your skin. The trapped blood appears as a black-and-blue mark.
If your skin isn't broken, you don't need a bandage, but you enhance bruise healing with these simple techniques:
  • Elevate the injured area.
  • Apply ice or a cold pack several times a day for a day or two after the injury.
  • Rest the bruised area, if possible.
  • Consider acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) for pain relief, or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) for pain relief and to reduce swelling.
To distinguish a minor burn from a serious burn, the first step is to determine the extent of damage to body tissues. The three burn classifications of first-degree burn, second-degree burn and third-degree burn will help you determine emergency care.
1st-degree burnThe least serious burns are those in which only the outer layer of skin is burned, but not all the way through.
  • The skin is usually red
  • Often there is swelling
  • Pain sometimes is present
Treat a first-degree burn as a minor burn unless it involves substantial portions of the hands, feet, face, groin or buttocks, or a major joint, which requires emergency medical attention.
2nd-degree burnWhen the first layer of skin has been burned through and the second layer of skin (dermis) also is burned, the injury is called a second-degree burn.
  • Blisters develop
  • Skin takes on an intensely reddened, splotchy appearance
  • There is severe pain and swelling.
If the second-degree burn is no larger than 3 inches (7.6 centimeters) in diameter, treat it as a minor burn. If the burned area is larger or if the burn is on the hands, feet, face, groin or buttocks, or over a major joint, treat it as a major burn and get medical help immediately.
For minor burns, including first-degree burns and second-degree burns limited to an area no larger than 3 inches (7.6 centimeters) in diameter, take the following action:
  • Cool the burn. Hold the burned area under cool (not cold) running water for 10 or 15 minutes or until the pain subsides. Cooling the burn reduces swelling by conducting heat away from the skin. Don't put ice on the burn.
  • Cover the burn with a sterile gauze bandage. Don't use fluffy cotton, or other material that may get lint in the wound. Wrap the gauze loosely to avoid putting pressure on burned skin. Bandaging keeps air off the burn, reduces pain and protects blistered skin.
  • Take an over-the-counter pain reliever. These include aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Aleve) or acetaminophen (Tylenol, others). Use caution when giving aspirin to children or teenagers. Though aspirin is approved for use in children older than age 2, children and teenagers recovering from chickenpox or flu-like symptoms should never take aspirin. Talk to your doctor if you have concerns.
Minor burns usually heal without further treatment. They may heal with pigment changes, meaning the healed area may be a different color from the surrounding skin. Watch for signs of infection, such as increased pain, redness, fever, swelling or oozing. If infection develops, seek medical help. 
  • Don't use ice. Putting ice directly on a burn can cause a person's body to become too cold and cause further damage to the wound.
  • Don't apply egg whites, butter or ointments to the burn. This could cause infection.
  • Don't break blisters. Broken blisters are more vulnerable to infection.
Electrical Burns
While helping someone with an electrical burn and waiting for medical help, follow these steps:
·         Look first. Don't touch. The person may still be in contact with the electrical source. Touching the person may pass the current through you.
·         Turn off the source of electricity if possible. If not, move the source away from both you and the injured person using a dry, nonconducting object made of cardboard, plastic or wood.
·         Check for signs of circulation (breathing, coughing or movement). If absent, begin cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) immediately.
·         Prevent shock. Lay the person down with the head slightly lower than the trunk, if possible, and the legs elevated.
·         Cover the affected areas. If the person is breathing, cover any burned areas with a sterile gauze bandage, if available, or a clean cloth. Don't use a blanket or towel, because loose fibers can stick to the burns.
Chemical Burns
If a chemical burns the skin, follow these steps:
·         Remove the cause of the burn by first brushing any remaining dry chemical and then rinsing the chemical off the skin surface with cool, gently running water for 10 to 20 minutes or more.
·         Remove clothing or jewelry that has been contaminated by the chemical.
·         Wrap the burned area loosely with a dry, sterile dressing (if available) or a clean cloth.
·         Rewash the burned area for several more minutes if the person experiences increased burning after the initial washing.
·         Take an over-the-counter pain reliever if needed for pain. These include aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others. Use caution when giving aspirin to children or teenagers. Though aspirin is approved for use in children older than age 2, children and teenagers recovering from chickenpox or flu-like symptoms should never take aspirin.
·         Get a tetanus shot. All burns are susceptible to tetanus. Doctors recommend you get a tetanus shot every 10 years. If your last shot was more than five years ago, your doctor may recommend a tetanus shot booster.
Signs and symptoms include:
  • Shivering
  • Slurred speech
  • Abnormally slow breathing
  • Cold, pale skin
  • Loss of coordination
  • Fatigue, lethargy or apathy
  • Confusion or memory loss
  • Bright red, cold skin (infants)
·         Call 911 or emergency medical assistance. While waiting for help to arrive, monitor the person's breathing. If breathing stops or seems dangerously slow or shallow, begin cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) immediately.
·         Move the person out of the cold. If going indoors isn't possible, protect the person from the wind, cover his or her head, and insulate his or her body from the cold ground.
·         Remove wet clothing. Replace wet things with a warm, dry covering.
·         Don't apply direct heat. Don't use hot water, a heating pad or a heating lamp to warm the victim. Instead, apply warm compresses to the center of the body — head, neck, chest wall and groin. Don't attempt to warm the arms and legs. Heat applied to the arms and legs forces cold blood back toward the heart, lungs and brain, causing the core body temperature to drop. This can be fatal.
·         Don't give the person alcohol. Offer warm nonalcoholic drinks, unless the person is vomiting.
Heat cramps
  • Rest briefly and cool down
  • Drink clear juice or an electrolyte-containing sports drink
  • Practice gentle, range-of-motion stretching and gentle massage of the affected muscle group
  • Don't resume strenuous activity for several hours or longer after heat cramps go away
  • Call your doctor if your cramps don't go away within one hour or so

Heat Exhaustion (Early Stages)
Signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion often begin suddenly, sometimes after excessive exercise, heavy perspiration, and inadequate fluid or salt intake. Signs and symptoms resemble those of shock and may include:
  • Feeling faint or dizzy
  • Nausea
  • Heavy sweating
  • Rapid, weak heartbeat
  • Low blood pressure
  • Cool, moist, pale skin
  • Low-grade fever
  • Heat cramps
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Dark-colored urine
If you suspect heat exhaustion:
  • Get the person out of the sun and into a shady or air-conditioned location.
  • Lay the person down and elevate the legs and feet slightly.
  • Loosen or remove the person's clothing.
  • Have the person drink cool water or other nonalcoholic beverage without caffeine.
  • Cool the person by spraying or sponging him or her with cool water and fanning.
  • Monitor the person carefully. Heat exhaustion can quickly become heatstroke.
If fever greater than 102 F (38.9 C), fainting, confusion or seizures occur, call 911 or emergency medical help.

Heat Stroke (Late Stages)
Heatstroke is the most severe of the heat-related problems, often resulting from exercise or heavy work in hot environments combined with inadequate fluid intake.
Young children, older adults, people who are obese and people born with an impaired ability to sweat are at high risk of heatstroke. Other risk factors include dehydration, alcohol use, cardiovascular disease and certain medications.
What makes heatstroke severe and potentially life-threatening is that the body's normal mechanisms for dealing with heat stress, such as sweating and temperature control, are inadequate. The main sign of heatstroke is a markedly elevated body temperature — generally greater than 104 F (40 C) — with changes in mental status ranging from personality changes to confusion and coma. Skin may be hot and dry — although if heatstroke is caused by exertion, the skin may be moist.
Other signs and symptoms may include:
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Rapid and shallow breathing
  • Elevated or lowered blood pressure
  • Cessation of sweating
  • Irritability, confusion or unconsciousness
  • Feeling dizzy or lightheaded
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Fainting, which may be the first sign in older adults
If you suspect heatstroke:
  • Move the person out of the sun and into a shady or air-conditioned space.
  • Call 911 or emergency medical help.
  • Cool the person by covering him or her with damp sheets or by spraying with cool water. Direct air onto the person with a fan or newspaper.
  • Have the person drink cool water or other nonalcoholic beverage without caffeine, if he or she is able.
Head, Neck and Back Injuries
  • There's evidence of a head injury with an ongoing change in the person's level of consciousness
  • The person complains of severe pain in his or her neck or back
  • The person won't move his or her neck
  • An injury has exerted substantial force on the back or head
  • The person complains of weakness, numbness or paralysis or lacks control of his or her limbs, bladder or bowels
  • The neck or back is twisted or positioned oddly
If you suspect someone has a spinal injury:
  • Call 911 or emergency medical help.
  • Keep the person still. Place heavy towels on both sides of the neck or hold the head and neck to prevent movement. The goal of first aid for a spinal injury is to keep the person in much the same position as he or she was found.
  • Provide as much first aid as possible without moving the person's head or neck. If the person shows no signs of circulation (breathing, coughing or movement), begin CPR, but do not tilt the head back to open the airway. Use your fingers to gently grasp the jaw and lift it forward. If the person has no pulse, begin chest compressions.
  • If the person is wearing a helmet, don't remove it.
  • If you absolutely must roll the person because he or she is vomiting, choking on blood or in danger of further injury, you need at least one other person. With one of you at the head and another along the side of the injured person, work together to keep the person's head, neck and back aligned while rolling the person onto one
Muscle Bone and Joint Injuries
·         Protect the injured limb from further injury by not using the joint. You can do this using anything from splints to crutches.
·         Rest the injured limb. But don't avoid all activity.
·         Ice the area. Use a cold pack, a slush bath or a compression sleeve filled with cold water to help limit swelling after an injury. Try to ice the area as soon as possible after the injury and continue to ice it for 10 to 15 minutes four times a day for 48 hours.
·         Compress the area with an elastic wrap or bandage. Compressive wraps or sleeves made from elastic or neoprene are best.
·         Elevate the injured limb above your heart whenever possible to help prevent or limit swelling.
  • Burns or redness around the mouth and lips, from drinking certain poisons
  • Breath that smells like chemicals, such as gasoline or paint thinner
  • Burns, stains and odors on the person, on his or her clothing, or on the furniture, floor, rugs or other objects in the surrounding area
  • Empty medication bottles or scattered pills
  • Vomiting, difficulty breathing, sleepiness, confusion or other unexpected signs
Call 911 or your local emergency number immediately if the person is:
  • Drowsy or unconscious
  • Having difficulty breathing or has stopped breathing
  • Uncontrollably restless or agitated
  • Having seizures
·         Stay calm
·         Prevent injury
During the seizure, you can exercise your common sense by insuring there is nothing within reach that could harm the person if she struck it.
·         Pay attention to the length of the seizure
·         Make the person as comfortable as possible
·         Keep onlookers away
·         Do not hold the person down
If the person having a seizure thrashes around there is no need for you to restrain them. Remember to consider your safety as well
·         Do not put anything in the person's mouth
Contrary to popular belief, a person having a seizure is incapable of swallowing their tongue so you can breathe easy in the knowledge that you do not have to stick your fingers into the mouth of someone in this condition.
·         Do not give the person water, pills, or food until fully alert
·         If the seizure continues for longer than five minutes, call 911
·         Be sensitive and supportive, and ask others to do the same
·         After the seizure, the person should be placed on her left side. Keep in mind there is a small risk of post-seizure vomiting, before the person is fully alert. Therefore, the person’s head should be turned so that any vomit will drain out of the mouth without being inhaled. Stay with the person until she recovers (5 to 20 minutes).
  • The skin is cool and clammy. It may appear pale or gray.
  • The pulse is weak and rapid. Breathing may be slow and shallow, or hyperventilation (rapid or deep breathing) may occur. Blood pressure is below normal.
  • The person may be nauseated. He or she may vomit.
  • The eyes lack luster and may seem to stare. Sometimes the pupils are dilated.
  • The person may be conscious or unconscious. If conscious, the person may feel faint or be very weak or confused. Shock sometimes causes a person to become overly excited and anxious.
  • Call 911 or your local emergency number.
Stroke Symptoms
        F.A.S.T. Recognition of Stroke
·         Face - weakness on one side of the face
·         Arm -weakness or numbness in one arm
·         Speech - slurred speech
·         Time - time to Call 9-1-1
Puncture Wound
·         Stop the bleeding. Minor cuts and scrapes usually stop bleeding on their own. If they don't, apply gentle pressure with a clean cloth or bandage. If bleeding persists — if the blood spurts or continues to flow after several minutes of pressure — seek emergency assistance.
·         Clean the wound. Rinse the wound well with clear water. Use tweezers cleaned with alcohol to remove small, superficial particles. If debris still remains in the wound, see your doctor. Thorough wound cleaning reduces the risk of tetanus. To clean the area around the wound, use soap and a clean cloth.
·         Apply an antibiotic. After you clean the wound, apply a thin layer of an antibiotic cream
·         Cover the wound. Exposure to air speeds healing, but bandages can help keep the wound clean and keep harmful bacteria out.
·         Change the dressing. Do so at least daily or whenever it becomes wet or dirty. If you're allergic to the adhesive used in most bandages, switch to adhesive-free dressings or sterile gauze and hypoallergenic paper tape, which don't cause allergic reactions. These supplies are generally available at pharmacies.
·         Watch for signs of infection. See your doctor if the wound doesn't heal or if you notice any redness, drainage, warmth or swelling.
  • Take a cool bath or shower. You can also apply a clean towel dampened with cool water.
  • Apply an aloe vera or moisturizing lotion several times a day.
  • Leave blisters intact to speed healing and avoid infection. If they burst on their own, apply an antibacterial ointment on the open areas.
  • If needed, take an over-the-counter pain reliever such as aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Aleve) or acetaminophen (Tylenol, others). Use caution when giving aspirin to children or teenagers. Though aspirin is approved for use in children older than age 2, children and teenagers recovering from chickenpox or flu-like symptoms should never take aspirin. Talk to your doctor if you have concerns.
·         Don't use petroleum jelly, butter or other home remedies on your sunburn. They can prevent or delay healing.
Tooth (Knocked out)
  • Handle your tooth by the top or crown only, not the roots.
  • Don't rub the tooth or scrape it to remove debris. This damages the root surface, making the tooth less likely to survive.
  • Gently rinse your tooth in a bowl of tap water. Don't hold it under running water.
  • Try to replace your tooth in the socket. If it doesn't go all the way into place, bite down slowly and gently on gauze or a moistened tea bag to help keep it in place. Hold the tooth in place until you see your dentist.
  • If you can't replace your tooth in the socket, immediately place it in some milk, your own saliva or a warm, mild saltwater solution — 1/4 teaspoon salt to 1 quart water (about 1 milliliter of salt to about 1 liter water).
  • Get medical attention from a dentist or emergency room immediately.
Spider Bites
Try and identify the type of spider that bit you. Clean the site of the spider bite well with soap and water. Apply a cool compress over the spider bite location. If the bite is on an extremity, elevate it. Aspirin or acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) and antihistamines may be used to relieve minor signs and symptoms in adults. Use caution when giving aspirin to children or teenagers. Though aspirin is approved for use in children older than age 2, children and teenagers recovering from chickenpox or flu-like symptoms should never take aspirin. Talk to your doctor if you have concerns.
·         Ceanse the wound. Use soap and water to clean the wound and skin around the spider bite.
·         Slow the venom's spread. If the spider bite is on an arm or a leg, tie a snug bandage above the bite and elevate the limb to help slow or halt the venom's spread. Ensure that the bandage is not so tight that it cuts off circulation in your arm or leg.
·         Use a cold cloth at the spider bite location. Apply a cloth dampened with cold water or filled with ice.
·         Seek immediate medical attention. Treatment for the bite of a black widow may require an anti-venom medication. Doctors may treat a brown recluse spider bite with various medications.
Snake Bites
  • Remain calm
  • Immobilize the bitten arm or leg and stay as quiet as possible to keep the poison from spreading through your body
  • Remove jewelry before you start to swell
  • Position yourself, if possible, so that the bite is at or below the level of your heart
  • Cleanse the wound, but don't flush it with water, and cover it with a clean, dry dressing
  • Apply a splint to reduce movement of the affected area, but keep it loose enough so as not to restrict blood flow
  • Don't use a tourniquet or apply ice
  • Don't cut the wound or attempt to remove the venom
  • Don't drink caffeine or alcohol
  • Don't try to capture the snake, but try to remember its color and shape so you can describe it, which will help in your treatment
Call 911 or seek immediate medical attention, especially if the area changes color, begins to swell or is painful.
Tick Bites
  • Remove the tick promptly and carefully. Use tweezers to grasp the tick near its head or mouth and pull gently to remove the whole tick without crushing it.
  • If possible, seal the tick in a container. Put the container in your freezer. Your doctor may want to see the tick if you develop signs or symptoms of illness after a tick bite.
  • Use soap and water to wash your hands and the area around the tick bite after handling the tick.
  • Call your doctor if you aren't able to completely remove the tick.
Animal Bites
·         For minor wounds. If the bite barely breaks the skin and there's no danger of rabies, treat it as a minor wound. Wash the wound thoroughly with soap and water. Apply an antibiotic cream to prevent infection and cover the bite with a clean bandage.
·         For deep wounds. If the animal bite creates a deep puncture of the skin or the skin is badly torn and bleeding, apply pressure with a clean, dry cloth to stop the bleeding and see your doctor.
·         For infection. If you notice signs of infection, such as swelling, redness, increased pain or oozing, see your doctor immediately
Disclaimer: This information is not intended as a substitute for professional medical advice, emergency treatment or formal first-aid training. Don't use this information to diagnose or develop a treatment plan for a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified health care provider. If you're in a life-threatening or emergency medical situation, seek medical assistance immediately  (MayoClinic 2012).
Mayo Clinic (2012). First Aid. Retrieved February 5, 2012 from http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/FirstAidIndex/FirstAidIndex
Steven C. M.D. Epilepsy (2012).  Project Epilepsy. Retrieved February 5, 2012 from http://www.epilepsy.com/EPILEPSY/firstaid

Web Links

First Aid
Accidents happen. Whether it's a minor cut, scrape, or burn, or something more serious, do you have what you need to give first aid? Be prepared with this handy tool from WebMD. Tell us a few things about your family, and you'll get a list of items that a well-stocked first aid kit should have -- as well as some suggestions on how to keep kits handy.
The CDC Emergency Preparedness and Response website is CDC’s primary source of information and resources for preparing for and responding to public health emergencies. This site continues to keep the public informed about public health emergencies and provides the information needed to protect and save lives
PA has resources for you to be prepared for and respond to both natural disasters and hazardous substance spills. Please use the links below to report an environmental emergency or violation.
FEMA’s mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.
DISASTER. It strikes anytime, anywhere. It takes many forms -- a hurricane, an earthquake, a tornado, a flood, a fire or a hazardous spill, an act of nature or an act of terrorism. It builds over days or weeks, or hits suddenly, without warning. Every year, millions of Americans face disaster, and its terrifying consequences.
On March 1, 2003, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) became part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS). Prepare your family
FEMA Your family may not be together when a disaster strikes so it is important to plan in advance: how you will get to a safe place; how you will contact one another; how you will get back together; and what you will do in different situations. Read more about Family Communication during an emergency.
Get the facts you need — before, during, and after a disaster or emergency situation. As the nation's preeminent preparedness and safety training organization, the American Red Cross developed the following emergency-specific checklists using the latest research, science, best practices and expert opinion. Choose to download and print the topics most appropriate in your area. Be Red Cross ready
  CBS news disaster links is the most comprehensive list of web links about disaster

LDS Emergency Preparedness. Be Prepared, Not Scared!

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